Parkinson’s Foundation Hosts Annual Celebrate Spring New York

The Parkinson’s Foundation is hosting its Annual Celebrate Spring New York event, which will take place on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 at Lavo located at 39 East 58th Street between Madison and Park Avenues. Proceeds from the evening will support the foundation’s research programs.
Celebrate Spring New York was founded by G. Pennington Egbert III, his sister Missy Egbert Sheehan and their close friend Georgina B. Schaeffer whose fathers both lived with Parkinson’s disease. Each year the committee hosts Celebrate Spring New York, which has raised $910,000 since its inception and has brought countless young supporters into the fold to help fund the work of future leaders in Parkinson’s research and care.

G. Pennington Egbert III, Missy Egbert Sheehan and William B. Sheehan, Jr., Andrew Gustin, George and Peggy Hebard, Josh and Melissa Raskin, Jonathan and Katy Romero, Adam and Kim Wolfberg, and Darren and Michele Wolfberg are the Co-Chairs.

The event will begin at 7:00 PM with cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, a live auction and dancing, with music provided by DJ Brenda Black. Support levels are as follows: sponsorships at $25,000, $10,000, $5,000, $2,500, $1,250, $500 and individual tickets at $175.

For more information on the Parkinson’s Foundation and to purchase tickets, please contact Kate Dixon at (646) 388 – 7635 or by email at You can also visit to purchase tickets directly.

For press information, contact Tony Manning Consulting at (212) 980-1711 or at

About the Parkinson’s Foundation
The Parkinson’s Foundation makes life better for people with Parkinson’s disease by improving care and advancing research toward a cure. In everything we do, we build on the energy, experience and passion of our global Parkinson’s community. For more information, visit or call (800) 4PD-INFO (473-4636).

About Parkinson’s Disease
Affecting an estimated one million Americans and 10 million worldwide, Parkinson’s disease is the second-most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s and is the 14th-leading cause of death in the United States. It is associated with a progressive loss of motor control (e.g., shaking or tremor at rest and lack of facial expression), as well as non-motor symptoms (e.g., depression and anxiety). There is no cure for Parkinson’s and 60,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States alone.

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